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H-el-ical aka Hikaru!!!

Gauchi

I like Yuki
Imo splendore is the worst song so far...pulsation was a bit generic, but had a nice melody, Avaricia was legit good with that “jazzy” feel to it, but this song is plain boring. Hikaru’s singing is as beautiful as always though.

It seems like Hel-i-cal is mostly going for that “generic anisong” kind of sound. Still gonna follow the project though, because Hikaru <3
 

Hayden Kurosaki

7 billion humans. She must know I exist
My opinion at the end of August is that Splendore has truly infected me. I mean, really. BUT it's gonna take some prayer and fasting for anything to top Avaricia. And Pulsation is cool, but I have to say, this order of likes is probably less than a level apart.

Like, none of the songs are bad.
 

Atlas Star

Sailor Yuki
@ghostreaper I cannot agree more. I'll be buying every edition of this release!~ (secretly gonna skip out on Wakana's live BluRay release for H-el-ical merch)

I did some analysis of the lyrics for "Splendore" (with it being my most favorite song at this moment) and had several translation questions I hope some of you can help me out with:

-"te wo nobaseba tsukamesounakurai" / "te wo hirogete norikiranaikurai" - Can somebody explain the "sounakurai" and "kurai" meaning to me? On the internet, I've discovered that the -kurai can mean "to the extent that"/"so...that". I'm utterly confused about its use and meaning!

-"nandaka nemutakunatte me wo tojite" - According to her English translations (and Google translate), this line means "When I felt sleepy, I closed my eyes.". However.... "nemutakunatte" I presumed comes from "nemutakunai", which is the negative form of "to want to sleep" (nemutai). So, shouldn't this mean "when I felt NOT sleepy"??

-"mita koto no aru heya ni warau" - I had originally thought this line meant "In the apartment where the things I saw were, I laugh." Thinking that "Koto no aru" (the existence of things) referred to "mita" (saw), but the translations are " laugh in a room I've seen". Can somebody explain this line to me?

-"sugoikoto dato nadeteageyou" / "yasashiku tsutsumi nadeteageyou" - I researched the adverb "ageru" to have to do with "the act of giving". Thus, I presumed that nadeteageyou would mean "to give someone/something a pat", correct?

-"konna ni aru hazuna noni ne" - This line screwed me over!! nanonine??? I was flipping out. I broke it down to "hazu-na" (should be), "noni" (even though), and "ne". Please correct me if I'm wrong in doing so. But... I have no idea how we came to the conclusion that this line means "Even though there should be so many of them" in conjunction with the next line "hitotsumo onajimono ga nai doremo"... How does "konna ni aru" play a role in this sentence, and what does it mean?


I like doing my own translations to learn the Japanese language more. I used to do this with Kalafina songs! And thought it'd be nice to do so with Hikaru's-- I mean, H-el-ical's.

Any help would be greatly appreciated! Thank you in advance :3
 

yuki.n

Bowl of Yuki-shaped cereal
Disclaimer: I'm still dizzy and failed to translate "from the edge". If I write nonsense, yell at me and I'll get back to you when I'm better.

-"te wo nobaseba tsukamesounakurai" / "te wo hirogete norikiranaikurai" - Can somebody explain the "sounakurai" and "kurai" meaning to me? On the internet, I've discovered that the -kurai can mean "to the extent that"/"so...that". I'm utterly confused about its use and meaning!
tsukamesou => tsukamu + -eru (to be able to ...) + sou => looks like I am able to grab
tsukamesou na kurai = so much (so close?) that it looks like I could grab it

Similarly, te wo hirogete norikiranai kurai = so much (so strong?) that I can't overcome it [even] if I stretch out my arms

-"nandaka nemutakunatte me wo tojite" - According to her English translations (and Google translate), this line means "When I felt sleepy, I closed my eyes.". However.... "nemutakunatte" I presumed comes from "nemutakunai", which is the negative form of "to want to sleep" (nemutai). So, shouldn't this mean "when I felt NOT sleepy"??
No, that's nemutaku naru => from nemutai + naru => to get sleepy (it becomes so that I want to sleep)

-"mita koto no aru heya ni warau" - I had originally thought this line meant "In the apartment where the things I saw were, I laugh." Thinking that "Koto no aru" (the existence of things) referred to "mita" (saw), but the translations are " laugh in a room I've seen". Can somebody explain this line to me?
It's actually the same as "~ta + koto ga aru" which refers to having experience something, e.g. nihon ni itta koto ga aru = I've been to Japan. "koto no aru" is an alternate syntax of the same. So "mita koto no aru heya" means "a room that I've seen".

Usually, "koto" doesn't refer to a tangible object, but to a situation, that's the difference with "mono". In that way, "~ta koto ga" is "the situation of having ~-ed". (If that confuses you even more, just ignore it)

-"sugoikoto dato nadeteageyou" / "yasashiku tsutsumi nadeteageyou" - I researched the adverb "ageru" to have to do with "the act of giving". Thus, I presumed that nadeteageyou would mean "to give someone/something a pat", correct?
Yep. It refers to giving something to someone as a present or as a favour.

-"konna ni aru hazuna noni ne" - This line screwed me over!! nanonine??? I was flipping out. I broke it down to "hazu-na" (should be), "noni" (even though), and "ne". Please correct me if I'm wrong in doing so. But... I have no idea how we came to the conclusion that this line means "Even though there should be so many of them" in conjunction with the next line "hitotsumo onajimono ga nai doremo"... How does "konna ni aru" play a role in this sentence, and what does it mean?
"konna ni aru" means "there's so many of them".

"hazu na no ni ne" - your break-down here is correct, "although there should be".

So we come to "although there should be so many of them".

Hitotsu mo onaji mono ga nai, doremo => here the "mo" with the negation means "not at all", so it means "not a single one of these is the same". "doremo" is just for emphasis.

Put together, it becomes "even though there should be so many of them, not a single one of these is the same". Many things, but all of them different to each other.

Hope that somehow makes sense.
 

yuki.n

Bowl of Yuki-shaped cereal
No worries :bow: I'm glad it made sense to you!

BTW, that's mostly N4-level grammar. Have you looked at N5 sample tests? It might be that you can pass that without much effort.
 

Atlas Star

Sailor Yuki
No worries :bow: I'm glad it made sense to you!

BTW, that's mostly N4-level grammar. Have you looked at N5 sample tests? It might be that you can pass that without much effort.
Oh no no no no all of my knowledge comes directly from the internet :XD: I know nothing!!!!!

What is N#-level? Is this an international standard?

One more thing to bother you on.....

Beginning of second chorus: "hirari hikatte koko ni irutte iu nowa"

I've seen "iu" used after "to" to indicate what someone says.... but have never seen it used after "-tte". What does this form indicate?
 

yuki.n

Bowl of Yuki-shaped cereal
Oh no no no no all of my knowledge comes directly from the internet :XD: I know nothing!!!!!
Well, maybe you can start self-studying from a book and then get ready for an exam! My brother learned Japanese because he liked a certain manga which was getting translated too slowly, so he thought "meh, if I learned Japanese myself I'd still translate it faster", and the rest is history :XD:

What is N#-level? Is this an international standard?
Yes, https://www.jlpt.jp/e/about/index.html - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Japanese-Language_Proficiency_Test
Basically N5 is a bit more than hello-basic, but you still get a nice written certification for that. N1 is at the same level as Japanese highschool graduates.

Beginning of second chorus: "hirari hikatte koko ni irutte iu nowa"

I've seen "iu" used after "to" to indicate what someone says.... but have never seen it used after "-tte". What does this form indicate?
"-tte iu" is the same as "to iu", just a bit more casual :bow:
 
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