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Heya! Helba here.

Helba

I like Yuki
#1
I've been following Kajiura-sama on and off for about ten years now; due to other circumstances I kept myself mostly hidden. However, now, I have decided to come onboard.

I first discovered Kajiura-sama through a very poorly copied .mp3 file of "In the Land of Twilight, Under the Moon." I was entranced. From that day gradually I branched out from .hack//SIGN to the 'Girls with Guns' Trilogy (Noir, Madlax, El Cazador), outward to Aquarian Age, the Fiction Albums, Xenosaga, Mai-Hime, the rest is history.

In the time not hunting the echelons of the World Wide Web for the remainder of the Albums, I study Philosophy, especially metaphysics and epistemology. I am currently engrossed in studying Alfred North Whitehead's Process and Reality, particularly with regard to the application of philosophy to computer science. Alternatively, I play video games (Zelda has been a favorite since about 1999). I also study linguistics in the general sense (I speak Japanese (enough to get around the country), and have studied a bit of German, Hebrew, Latin, Greek, Ainu, and Na'vi); I am investigating the idea of using Kajiura's nonlexical vocals (Kajiura-go) as the basis for a constructed language.

I generally listen to Yuki Kajiura in times of study (as of my current iteration of the Great Hunt of her works, 4,028 Tracks (but, this does includes the stuff she didn't do, on albums she had a few tracks on, like Hyper Yocomix) across 237 complete albums (naturally, containing the stuff she didn't do), with more along the way. For listening, Joe Hisaishi is a close second, but I also like Bear McCreary, Hiroyuki Sawano, John Williams, Hans Zimmer, 1980's Rock and Pop, and of course, the Godfather of Video Game Music himself, Koji Kondo.

Now, then, the question becomes: why Yuki? Why not someone else as my musical Obsession? Well, I like things that are orderly, patterned, and complex. Music is this a lot of the time, but Kajiura-sama, that is another matter entirely: Kajiura-go, the synthesis of classical, eastern, western, modern, synthetic, and traditional instruments, truly much more satisfying of the complexity I like than other modern artists. The patterns of her music speak to something powerful: a whole new meaning of Eternal Recurrence. There is an intense depth to her composition, which is, from the artistic influence, something that I have found applications in music theory, linguistics, pattern sciences, cosmology; one might say Kajiura-sama is the person that got me interested in Alfred North Whitehead: the attempt to find the pure science of pattern and order in the universe. Truly, music to soothe the savage beast.

So, if you ever want to talk Yuki lightly, or seriously, make wild speculation, or just share something neat, I'd be open to talk, get feedback, whatever!

So, that's it, then. Let us maintain and share the legacy of Yuki-Kajiura-no-Mikoto, court musician of the Gods!.
 
#2
I speak Japanese (enough to get around the country), and have studied a bit of German, Hebrew, Latin, Greek, Ainu, and Na'vi);
Welcome! I speak almost no Japanese (still enough to get around the country).

How many times have you visited Japan? I have picked up some Ainu language study materials in Hokkaido (mainly from the Obihiro museum), but have already passed them on to others wishing to study the language. I'm happy to collect any that I see on future trips to Hokkaido if you want them.
 

Helba

I like Yuki
#4
Welcome! I speak almost no Japanese (still enough to get around the country).


Hajimemashite! @Kuguyama

How many times have you visited Japan? I have picked up some Ainu language study materials in Hokkaido (mainly from the Obihiro museum), but have already passed them on to others wishing to study the language. I'm happy to collect any that I see on future trips to Hokkaido if you want them.
Twice; but only as far north as Nagaoka; I spent most of my time in the south, around Okayama. Thanks for the offer for materials; I would like them! Thus far I have only the materials on the language collected by John Batchelor (an Anglican priest who lived among the Ainu from the Meiji Restoration until WWII- about 63 years! and Basil Hall Chamberlain in the same era, when the language was alive. I found them on the Internet Archive; here's the link, if interested:

https://archive.org/details/ainuenglishjapan00batcuoft/page/n4

Thanks for the offer! I would like to have access to those.
 

Helba

I like Yuki
#8
Welcome to the forum! What are those last languages u refered? If you wanna practise greek there are 2 people in this forum 😉
Nice! Ainu is an extinct tongue. It was the language of a hunter-gatherer people in Northern Japan called by the same name. It is featured in the manga Golden Kamui, as one example, however, I had read John Batchelor's book on the language which was published in 1901 before that. As it happens, Ms. Kajiura's upcoming soundtrack work, Eien no Nispa, is a show more than likely about the Ainu because Nispa (or Nishpa) is an Ainu word meaning "Lord" (According to Batchelor's book).​
As for Na'vi, it is a fully constructed language invented by Paul Fromm for the 2009 movie Avatar, that CGI-heavy James Cameron film. I did it as a test in constructed languages, 'getting my feet wet', as they say.​
Thanks for the advice on Greek. I think I will be fine, though; I mainly use it for scientific terminology so I can understand long 5+ syllable words like autopoiesis.​
 

VyseLegendaire

7 billion humans. She must know I exist
#9
Hello. You offered some some wild info in your bio. Please don't be disappoint'd when most of what you see on this forum is sardonic and dismissive ramblings from ex-soviet drunkards.
 
#10

Helba

I like Yuki
#12
As someone from a place which doesn't get regular snow, I've enjoyed visiting Hokkaido a lot. I visited the Ainu Museum in Shiraoi, Hokkaido before Kalafina's Sapporo concert in November 2017:

View attachment 23420
Hey, nice! I have heard of this cultural center! Thanks for the pic. So, you went to a live concert in Sapporo? Fun. To be fair, though, I personally would get a bad headache in a loud auditorium that size. Not fan enough, I guess...
 
#13
Hey, nice! I have heard of this cultural center! Thanks for the pic. So, you went to a live concert in Sapporo? Fun. To be fair, though, I personally would get a bad headache in a loud auditorium that size. Not fan enough, I guess...
The Kalafina concert in Sapporo was part of their acoustic live tour, not too loud at all.
 
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